Public Policy Resources

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As a recognized expert in cancer health policy, ACS CAN develops reports, white papers, testimony, fact sheets, regulatory comment letters and public policy on a wide range of issues related to preventing cancer and improving the health care system for persons with cancer and survivors.  We encourage you to use this resource to learn more about our issue priorities and policy work. If you can't find something you need, you may contact us by using our contact form and selecting Policy Resources from the drop-down menu.

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Photo of female cancer patient

Patient Quality of Life

ACS CAN advocates for policies that improve the lives of cancer patients by making treatment of their pain and other symptoms and coordination of their care standard protocol throughout their treatment for cancer, starting at the point of diagnosis.
 

Featured Resources

 

In August-September 2019, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) — through its Survivor Views Project  — conducted a survey of cancer patients and survivors to determine whether they were asking for and getting appropriate palliative care treatment. 

This table lists key studies and review articles that examine the effect that the addition of palliative care has on overall patient costs. While results vary, the addition of palliative care typically either reduces overall costs or is cost neutral.

In the fall of 2018 the U.S. House and Senate passed the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act.

Photo of ACS CAN Volunteers at Advocacy Event to Support Cancer Research Funding

Research, Funding and Drug Development

Improvements in outcomes for cancer patients require continued research and innovation.  ACS CAN advocates for robust federal funding for cancer research, as well as research and drug approval policies that accelerate the development of new treatments while still ensuring patient safety.

In response to ClinicalTrials.gov's request for information to guide their modernization process, ACS CAN, along with 14 other organizations, submitted extensive comments.  The suggestions were derived from multi-stakeholder collaborations underway over the past year and reflect consensus ideas a

In response to a request from FDA, ACS CAN has provided recommendations for areas of focus for the Office of Minority Health and Health Equity (OMHHE).  Recommendations include assessing the applicability of drug "snapshot" data, evaluating the appropriateness of aggregating racial groups for ana

In response to a request from Reps. Upton and DeGette for ideas to include in Cures 2.0 legislation, ACS CAN and six other organization urged the representatives to consider the recommendations for overcoming barriers to clinical trial participation published as part of a recent landscape report.

Photo of ACS CAN Volunteers participating in health care reform Lobby Day event

Access to Health Care

ACS CAN advocates for policies that provide access to treatments and services people with cancer need for their care - including those who may be newly diagnosed, in active treatment and cancer survivors.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the 2021 Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters proposed rule. ACS CAN is making cancer a top priority for public officials and candidates at the federal, state, and local levels.

Photo of Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Event Participant

Prevention and Early Detection

ACS CAN advocates for public policies that can prevent nearly half of all cancer deaths by ensuring access to recommended cancer screenings, protecting the public from skin cancer risk, reducing tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke and supporting people in increasing physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and managing their weight.

If detected early, cervical cancer is one of the most successfully treatable cancers. Incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer have declined by over 50 percent in the past 40 years, largely due to improved screening and early detection. However, the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Efforts to reduce barriers to screening could greatly improve cervical cancer screening rates, particularly for disparate populations.

The greatest avoidable known risk factor for skin cancer is the use of indoor tanning devices. Yet, each year, approximately nine million Americans engage in indoor tanning.The desire for a tanned appearance causes many people, especially young adults and teenagers, to ignore the serious risks and health warnings and use indoor tanning devices.

Despite reputable scientific studies showing that tanning devices can cause skin cancer, misconceptions about the risks and dangers of indoor tanning persist. This is due, in part, to misleading advertising and health claims by the tanning industry. This fact sheet debunks many of the most egregious industry claims about indoor tanning.