Public Policy Resources

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As a recognized expert in cancer health policy, ACS CAN develops reports, white papers, testimony, fact sheets, regulatory comment letters and public policy on a wide range of issues related to preventing cancer and improving the health care system for persons with cancer and survivors.  We encourage you to use this resource to learn more about our issue priorities and policy work. If you can't find something you need, you may contact us by using our contact form and selecting Policy Resources from the drop-down menu.

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Patient Quality of Life

ACS CAN advocates for policies that improve the lives of cancer patients by making treatment of their pain and other symptoms and coordination of their care standard protocol throughout their treatment for cancer, starting at the point of diagnosis.
 

Featured Resources

 

This table lists key studies and review articles that examine the effect that the addition of palliative care has on overall patient costs. While results vary, the addition of palliative care typically either reduces overall costs or is cost neutral.

 

In the fall of 2018 the House and Senate passed the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (the SUPPORT Act)1 comprehensive legislation to address the opioid epidemic.

Photo of ACS CAN Volunteers at Advocacy Event to Support Cancer Research Funding

Research, Funding and Drug Development

Improvements in outcomes for cancer patients require continued research and innovation.  ACS CAN advocates for robust federal funding for cancer research, as well as research and drug approval policies that accelerate the development of new treatments while still ensuring patient safety.

Restrictive eligibility criteria are the second leading cause preventing patients from enrolling in cancer clinical trials.  FDA recently issued draft guidance encouraging trial sponsors to use a science-based approach that would allow a wider variety of patients to participate in cancer clinical

Over 80 organizations are urging Congress to take up and pass reform to modernize the oversight of diagnostic test. 

Biomarker testing is critical to successfully realizing personalized medicine, both through the selection of appropriate targeted therapies as well as by directing patients to relevant clinical trials.  This report examines the private payer landscape of coverage for tumor biomarker tests in lung

Photo of ACS CAN Volunteers participating in health care reform Lobby Day event

Access to Health Care

ACS CAN advocates for policies that provide access to treatments and services people with cancer need for their care - including those who may be newly diagnosed, in active treatment and cancer survivors.

Last year, the Administrative finalized a regulation that expands access to short-term, limited-duration insurance products.

"Surprise billing” is when an insured patient is unknowingly treated by an out-of-network provider and is then billed the difference between what the provider charged, and what the insurer paid. Surprise bills can be significantly higher than the consumer’s standard in-network cost-sharing. 

Photo of Making Strides Against Breast Cancer Event Participant

Prevention and Early Detection

ACS CAN advocates for public policies that can prevent nearly half of all cancer deaths by ensuring access to recommended cancer screenings, protecting the public from skin cancer risk, reducing tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke and supporting people in increasing physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and managing their weight.

An estimated 145,000 men and women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2019 and 51,000 individuals are estimated to die from the disease. Without a continued, dedicated federal investment in colorectal cancer prevention and early detection, the U.S. could experience a reduction in screening leading to increases in completely preventable colorectal cancer cases and deaths. This factsheet discusses the importance of continued funding for the Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP).

NBCCEDP a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) program provides low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women access to breast and cervical cancer screenings and diagnostic services. Ensuring adequate funding for the NBCCEDP will preserve a critical safety net for American women who continue to lack access to lifesaving screening, diagnostic, and treatment services for breast and cervical cancers.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States. Yet, more than 1 in 3 adults age 50 and older are not getting tested as recommended. This factsheet discusses the importance of screening for colorectal cancer and what can be done to improve screening in the U.S.