Smoke-free

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No one should have to choose between their job and their health.  And the science clearly shows that secondhand smoke causes cancer, even for those who have never smoked a cigarette. 

We are working in local communities across the nation to make restaurants, bars, casinos and all workplaces smoke-free, protecting all workers from the dangers of secondhand smoke.

Nearly 60 percent of people across the country are protected by comprehensive smoke-free laws where they work.

Take Action

Photo of smoke-free sign on a restaurant table

It's time to protect everyone’s right to breathe clean smoke-free air!

No one should have to choose between their health and their job. Show your support for giving all employees the right to work in a place where smoking isn't allowed.

Latest Updates

October 13, 2020
Tennessee

Nashville, TN – Today, Nissan Stadium officials announced that the stadium will reopen for the Tennessee Titans home opener as a smoke-free facility. Emily Ogden, director of government relations in Tennessee for the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN), made the following statement in reaction. “As an organization

September 30, 2020
Nevada

On September 30, the Park MGM reopened as a smoke-free establishment amid the COVID-19 pandemic, marking the first time a casino will be smoke-free on the Strip. The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) applauds the casino’s decision to protect the health of workers and patrons.

September 23, 2020
Georgia

ATLANTA, GA – September 23, 2020 – Council Member Matt Westmoreland received the National Distinguished Advocacy Award last week, the most prestigious award presented by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN), in recognition of his significant contributions to the fight against cancer, including his successful efforts

September 4, 2020
New Jersey

Gov. Murphy today announced an upcoming Executive Order that will prohibit smoking in casinos.

Smoke-free Resources

ACS CAN advocates for comprehensive smoke-free laws in all workplaces to protect workers and the public from the harmful effects of secondhand exposure and to create communities that support tobacco-free living. 

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, with its partners, supports the Department of Housing and Urban Development's proposal to make public housing smoke-free.

More than 40 years after former U.S. Surgeon General Jesse Steinfeld first exposed the potential health risks of secondhand smoke (SHS) in 1971,1 and nearly 30 years after a subsequent Surgeon General’s report stated that SHS causes lung cancer and other diseases,2 all U.S.