Smoke-free

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No one should have to choose between their job and their health.  And the science clearly shows that secondhand smoke causes cancer, even for those who have never smoked a cigarette. 

We are working in local communities across the nation to make restaurants, bars, casinos and all workplaces smoke-free, protecting all workers from the dangers of secondhand smoke.

Nearly 60 percent of people across the country are protected by comprehensive smoke-free laws where they work.

Take Action

Photo of smoke-free sign on a restaurant table

It's time to protect everyone’s right to breathe clean smoke-free air!

No one should have to choose between their health and their job. Show your support for giving all employees the right to work in a place where smoking isn't allowed.

Latest Updates

May 2, 2019
Colorado

DENVER, Colo.— The Colorado General Assembly passed House Bill 1076 today to add e-cigarettes to the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act and prohibit their use in public places and workplaces. If signed by Gov. Jared Polis, the legislation will take effect on July 1. RJ Ours, the American Cancer Society

April 22, 2019
Nebraska

The following letter to the editor was published in the Grand Island Independent on April 19, 2019.

April 18, 2019
Colorado

DENVER, Colo.— The Colorado House of Representatives today passed a bill with a vote of 48-17 to prohibit the use of electronic cigarettes in public places and workplaces. House Bill 1076 will update the state’s Clean Indoor Air Act to include e-cigarettes and remove exemptions for assisted living homes, small

April 5, 2019
Alabama

The Tobacco Advocacy Panel: A Call for Action was held at the RSA Plaza Terrance in Montgomery to discuss the recent spike in tobacco use driven largely by the increased use of e-cigarettes among Alabama’s youth and the evidenced-based policies needed to reverse this trend.

Smoke-free Resources

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, with its partners, supports the Department of Housing and Urban Development's proposal to make public housing smoke-free.

More than 40 years after former U.S. Surgeon General Jesse Steinfeld first exposed the potential health risks of secondhand smoke (SHS) in 1971,1 and nearly 30 years after a subsequent Surgeon General’s report stated that SHS causes lung cancer and other diseases,2 all U.S.

The Surgeon General’s reported in 20061 and again 20102 that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS).