Breast and Cervical Cancer

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Mammograms save lives. But, even today, too many women don't have access to lifesaving breast and cervical cancer screenings.

We are working in Congress and in every state legislature to ensure funding for the federal cancer screening and early detection program that has already helped millions of women and saved thousands of lives.

More than 40,000 women will die from breast cancer this year, while over 13,000 will be diagnosed with cervical cancer.  We're working to convince Congress to increase funding for breast and cervical cancer research that could lead to new medical breakthroughs and save more lives.

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Let's save more lives from breast and cervical cancer

Join us in calling on Congress to ensure women – no matter where they live or how little money they make – can get a free or inexpensive breast or cervical cancer screening.

Latest Updates

September 9, 2021
National

Our thoughts and well wishes are with Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., as she shares her personal journey with early-stage breast cancer. Sen. Klobuchar’s recent statements on the importance of routine screenings and follow-up are reminders that finding cancer early can give the best chance for successful treatment.

July 15, 2021
National

Washington, D.C. ---Today the House Appropriations Committee will vote on a proposed FY 2022 spending bill that would increase funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) by $6.5 billion and include a $432 million increase for the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and $194 million for the Cancer Moonshot.

May 20, 2021
Iowa

Des Moines, Iowa – The Iowa Legislature approved a budget bill today that includes initiatives supported by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) to improve cancer prevention, early detection and treatment. The budget includes funding for Iowa’s tobacco prevention and cessation programs, which are proven to save

May 20, 2021
Florida

In 2021, the Florida State Legislature approved the total state funding of $1.83 million in recurring revenue for the Mary Brogan Breast & Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program. Recurring state funds provide a dedicated funding source and help build the long-term viability of the program. This marks a full decade that the Legislature has invested state dollars in the program.

Breast and Cervical Cancer Resources

For 30 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program has decreased disparities in breast and cervical cancer deaths.

If detected early, cervical cancer is one of the most successfully treatable cancers. Incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer have declined by over 50 percent in the past 40 years, largely due to improved screening and early detection. However, the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Efforts to reduce barriers to screening could greatly improve cervical cancer screening rates, particularly for disparate populations.