Breast and Cervical Cancer

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Mammograms save lives. But, even today, too many women don't have access to lifesaving breast and cervical cancer screenings.

We are working in Congress and in every state legislature to ensure funding for the federal cancer screening and early detection program that has already helped millions of women and saved thousands of lives.

More than 40,000 women will die from breast cancer this year, while over 13,000 will be diagnosed with cervical cancer.  We're working to convince Congress to increase funding for breast and cervical cancer research that could lead to new medical breakthroughs and save more lives.

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To my U.S. Senators: Increase funding for breast cancer research

Ask your Senator to fund a strong increase in funding for breast cancer research and lifesaving breast cancer prevention programs.

Latest Updates

October 8, 2020
South Carolina

COLUMBIA, SC – October 6, 2020 – In view of National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) hosted its annual Ann “Tunky” Riley Pink Tea event last week to celebrate breast cancer survivors and honor those who have lost their lives to the

October 6, 2020
Florida

ORLANDO, FL — October 5, 2020 — The COVID-19 pandemic has made it increasingly difficult for cancer patients and survivors to receive the care they need and has led to delays in preventive screenings, diagnostic testing and treatment care. A May survey from the American Cancer Society (ACS CAN)

July 31, 2020

Today the U.S. House of Representatives voted on an FY 2021 spending bill that includes a $5.5 billion funding increase for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Half of the increase would be considered emergency funding and the other half would be divided among the various institutes, including a nearly $470 million funding boost for the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

July 30, 2020
Minnesota

ST. PAUL, Minn. – Three pieces of legislation that reduce Minnesota’s cancer burden go into effect August 1st. The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) commends the implementation of the new state tobacco 21 law, clinical trials as well as breast and cervical cancer laws to address the

Breast and Cervical Cancer Resources

If detected early, cervical cancer is one of the most successfully treatable cancers. Incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer have declined by over 50 percent in the past 40 years, largely due to improved screening and early detection. However, the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Efforts to reduce barriers to screening could greatly improve cervical cancer screening rates, particularly for disparate populations.

NBCCEDP – a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) program – provides low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women access to breast and cervical cancer screenings and diagnostic services. Ensuring adequate funding for the NBCCEDP will preserve a critical safety net for American women who continue to lack access to lifesaving screening, diagnostic, and treatment services for breast and cervical cancers.

This factsheet discusses risk factors for breast cancer and the importance of screening in the U.S.