Tobacco Control

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Tobacco products are projected to kill one billion people worldwide this century. And the industry is showing no signs of slowing down, spending more than $9 billion on marketing each year. 

Despite the industry's deceptive and deadly practices, ACS CAN continues to have enormous success passing local, state and federal laws that prevent children from smoking, help adults quit and ensure the government uses its authority to regulate tobacco industry practices.

While our work has had an enormous impact on youth cigarette use - now at historic lows - the use of e-cigarettes among kids is skyrocketing.  This further reinforces the importance of continuing this lifesaving work.

Latest Updates

September 27, 2022
Connecticut

NORWALK – Representative Lucy Dathan received the National Distinguished Advocacy Award this week, the most prestigious award presented by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN), in recognition of her significant contributions to the fight against cancer. ACS CAN, the advocacy affiliate of the American Cancer Society, presents the

September 20, 2022
Oregon

Portland, OR . – Yesterday, Washington County Circuit Court ruled against an existing ordinance to end the sale of flavored tobacco in the county. The following can be attributed to Jamie Dunphy, Oregon director of government relations for ACS CAN: “This decision by the Circuit Court against Washington County’s

September 16, 2022
Maine

AUGUSTA – Maine Representatives Kristen Cloutier, Jay McCreight and Michele Meyer each received the National Distinguished Advocacy Award this week, the most prestigious award presented by the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN), in recognition of their significant contributions to the fight against cancer. Each were recognized for

September 6, 2022
National

JUUL announced a tentative deal to pay nearly $440 million to settle a two-year, multi-state investigation into its underage marketing practices to attract young consumers to its addictive e-cigarettes. Evidence-based tobacco control is still critical.

Tobacco Control Resources

Tobacco is still the number one cause of preventable death nationwide yet the current funding levels for tobacco control programs is not sufficient to prevent and address tobacco-related disparities. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that states annually spend 12% of funds from tobacco taxes and lawsuits on tobacco control programs.

Without sustained, dedicated federal investment in tobacco prevention and control for the Centers for Disease Control Office of Smoking and Health (OSH) , the public’s – particularly youth - health is at risk from increased tobacco use, decreased quitting rates, and greater exposure to secondhand smoke. All of these risks result in preventable tobacco-related disparities, as well as premature death.