Tobacco Control

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Tobacco products are projected to kill one billion people worldwide this century. And the industry is showing no signs of slowing down, spending more than $9 billion on marketing each year. 

Despite the industry's deceptive and deadly practices, ACS CAN continues to have enormous success passing local, state and federal laws that prevent children from smoking, help adults quit and ensure the government uses its authority to regulate tobacco industry practices.

While our work has had an enormous impact on youth cigarette use - now at historic lows - the use of e-cigarettes among kids is skyrocketing.  This further reinforces the importance of continuing this lifesaving work.

Latest Updates

November 17, 2022
Tennessee

KNOXVILLE, TN – November 17, 2022 – Cancer patients and survivors are marking the American Cancer Society's 47 th annual Great American Smokeout® today by shining a spotlight on the dangers of secondhand smoke and the importance of smoke-free laws in protecting the health of Knoxville residents. A recent

November 17, 2022
Alabama

MONTGOMERY, AL – November 17, 2022 – Cancer patients and survivors are marking the American Cancer Society's 47 th annual Great American Smokeout® today by calling on state officials to protect the health of Alabama residents by investing in the state’s tobacco cessation program to support adults who wish

November 17, 2022
South Carolina

GREER, SC– November 16, 2022 – Cancer patients and survivors are marking the American Cancer Society's 47 th annual Great American Smokeout® tomorrow by calling on elected officials to protect the health of all Greer residents by enacting a strong smoke-free law that protects residents from secondhand smoke exposure.

November 15, 2022
Indiana

State Lawmakers Can and Must Do Better When it Comes to Tobacco Control.

Tobacco Control Resources

Tobacco is still the number one cause of preventable death nationwide yet the current funding levels for tobacco control programs is not sufficient to prevent and address tobacco-related disparities. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that states annually spend 12% of funds from tobacco taxes and lawsuits on tobacco control programs.

Without sustained, dedicated federal investment in tobacco prevention and control for the Centers for Disease Control Office of Smoking and Health (OSH) , the public’s – particularly youth - health is at risk from increased tobacco use, decreased quitting rates, and greater exposure to secondhand smoke. All of these risks result in preventable tobacco-related disparities, as well as premature death.