Colorectal Cancer

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The science is clear. If Americans received regular screenings for colorectal cancer, thousands of deaths could be prevented each year. But, for too many Americans, the screenings either aren't fully covered by their health insurance or aren’t affordable due to high out-of-pocket costs. 

The 80% by 2018 campaign strives to pass state and federal laws that remove the barriers preventing people from getting colonoscopies and other lifesaving colorectal cancer screenings. 

Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. for men and women combined.

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U.S. House: Remove Barriers To Colorectal Cancer Screenings For Seniors

Ask your Representative to ensure that seniors on Medicare have access to colorectal cancer screening without any surprise out-of-pocket costs by cosponsoring and supporting the passage of the Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening Act, H.R. 1570. 

Latest Updates

July 31, 2020

Today the U.S. House of Representatives voted on an FY 2021 spending bill that includes a $5.5 billion funding increase for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Half of the increase would be considered emergency funding and the other half would be divided among the various institutes, including a nearly $470 million funding boost for the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

July 21, 2020
South Carolina

COLUMBIA, SC – July 21, 2020 – Despite national drops in cancer mortality and incidence rates, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second leading cause of cancer death for men and women in South Carolina. Black and Latinx communities across the state experience significantly higher rates of CRC as a

March 19, 2020
New Hampshire

CONCORD - Five years ago this February, Merrimack’s Tracy McGraw underwent her second surgery to treat her Stage 3C colon cancer. Originally diagnosed in 2012 at only 46 years old, she knows that detection, surgery and additional treatment, saved her life. Since her initial diagnosis, relapse, and long course of

March 3, 2020
Texas

AUSTIN, Texas – This fall, Texans on Medicaid with an average risk of receiving a colorectal cancer diagnosis may have their screenings covered starting at age 45. Texas Health and Human Services recently updated its Medicaid policy to align with current American Cancer Society guidelines, which lowers the starting age

Colorectal Cancer Resources

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States. Yet, more than 1 in 3 adults aged 50 to 75 are not getting tested as recommended. This factsheet discusses the importance of screening for colorectal cancer and what can be done to improve screening in the U.S.

 

An estimated 147,950 men and women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2020 and 53,200 individuals are estimated to die from the disease. Without a continued, dedicated federal investment in colorectal cancer prevention and early detection, the U.S. could experience a reduction in screening leading to increases in completely preventable colorectal cancer cases and deaths. This factsheet discusses the importance of continued funding for the Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP).