Prevention and Cessation

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We have launched campaigns in cities and states across the nation to prevent stores from selling tobacco products to people under age 21.  Already passed in California, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, and Oregon, and hundreds of cities, this change promises to make it less likely that children become addicted to tobacco products.

Overall, our work to reduce tobacco use has led to funding for highly successful quitlines and youth programs that educate children about the perils of using tobacco, including cigarettes, hookah and e-cigarettes. 

Together, these programs and our Tobacco 21 campaign will help prevent children from starting a deadly tobacco addiction and help more adults quit. 

Smoking rates are at their lowest levels in decades, with 8 percent of high school kids and 15.5 percent of adults smoking cigarettes.

Take Action

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Oppose efforts to weaken government oversight of tobacco products

Ask Congress to oppose efforts to weaken the FDA's oversight authority over all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, cigars and hookahs.

Latest Updates

October 23, 2019
Utah

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah—Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the nation. This year roughly 1,300 Utah adults will die from smoking and 800 kids under age 18 will become new daily smokers. Additionally, $542 million in annual health care costs in Utah can be attributed to

October 23, 2019
Oregon

PORTLAND, Ore. —Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death, and this year tobacco use will kill roughly 5,500 Oregonians. Tobacco use causes nearly 30% of all cancer deaths. The financial costs of tobacco to the state is substantial through health care costs and lost economic productivity, and the

September 21, 2019
Idaho

An upcoming cancer forum on September 24 th in Boise will feature a keynote address by Dr. Bonnie Halpern-Felsher, one of the country’s top tobacco researchers. Halpern-Felsher will speak about Big Tobacco’s strategy to hook youth into a lifetime of addiction through aggressive marketing and enticing candy, fruit and menthol

September 19, 2019
Massachusetts

Link to letter online To the editor: As a concerned healthcare worker and volunteer with the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, I am writing to stress the alarming increased use of e-cigarettes and flavored tobacco products in middle and high school students. In 2011, 1.5 percent

Prevention and Cessation Resources

Flavors are a marketing weapon the tobacco manufacturers use to target youth and young people to a lifetime of addiction. The use of any flavored tobacco product among youth is concerning because it exposes them to a lifetime of nicotine addiction, disease, and premature death.

The U.S. Secretary of HHS, U.S. Surgeon General, and Commissioner of the FDA have all declared youth e-cigarette use to be an epidemic. E-cigarette use among high school students has risen by 78 percent in the last year and 48 percent among middle school students. Furthermore, e-cigarette use is most common among younger adults – not older adults. Action is needed to reverse these trends.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) supports raising the minimum age for sale of all tobacco products to age 21 with strong retailer compliance and active enforcement as part of its comprehensive strategy to reduce youth initiation.