Prevention and Cessation

Share

We have launched campaigns in cities and states across the nation to prevent stores from selling tobacco products to people under age 21.  Already passed in California, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, and Oregon, and hundreds of cities, this change promises to make it less likely that children become addicted to tobacco products.

Overall, our work to reduce tobacco use has led to funding for highly successful quitlines and youth programs that educate children about the perils of using tobacco, including cigarettes, hookah and e-cigarettes. 

Together, these programs and our Tobacco 21 campaign will help prevent children from starting a deadly tobacco addiction and help more adults quit. 

Smoking rates are at their lowest levels in decades, with 8 percent of high school kids and 15.5 percent of adults smoking cigarettes.

Latest Updates

January 13, 2023

Even as tobacco use remains the number one cause of preventable death in the United States and youth e-cigarette use remains at high levels, a new report highlights how too many states continue to shortchange programs designed to prevent kids from using tobacco products and help tobacco users quit.

January 4, 2023
Wisconsin

MADISON, Wis. – “As lawmakers dive into the 2023 legislative session, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) urges legislators to prioritize passing legislation to ease the burden of cancer on Wisconsinites. “The legislature should act to support policies to preserve funding and access to BadgerCare for

January 4, 2023
Minnesota

ST. PAUL, Minn . – “As lawmakers dive into the 2023 legislative session, the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) urges legislators to prioritize passing legislation to ease the burden of cancer on Minnesotans. “ACS CAN calls on the legislature to improve coverage of comprehensive biomarker testing,

December 7, 2022

Today’s decision by a federal judge to block implementation of graphic cigarette warnings ordered by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is wrong on the law, inconsistent with decades of precedent and harms public health.

Prevention and Cessation Resources

Eliminating tobacco-related disparities requires that Medicaid enrollees have access to comprehensive cessation benefits without cost-sharing or other barriers to quit tobacco.

Tobacco is still the number one cause of preventable death nationwide yet the current funding levels for tobacco control programs is not sufficient to prevent and address tobacco-related disparities. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that states annually spend 12% of funds from tobacco taxes and lawsuits on tobacco control programs.

Without sustained, dedicated federal investment in tobacco prevention and control for the Centers for Disease Control Office of Smoking and Health (OSH) , the public’s – particularly youth - health is at risk from increased tobacco use, decreased quitting rates, and greater exposure to secondhand smoke. All of these risks result in preventable tobacco-related disparities, as well as premature death.