Prevention and Cessation

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We have launched campaigns in cities and states across the nation to prevent stores from selling tobacco products to people under age 21.  Already passed in California, Hawaii, Maine, New Jersey, and Oregon, and hundreds of cities, this change promises to make it less likely that children become addicted to tobacco products.

Overall, our work to reduce tobacco use has led to funding for highly successful quitlines and youth programs that educate children about the perils of using tobacco, including cigarettes, hookah and e-cigarettes. 

Together, these programs and our Tobacco 21 campaign will help prevent children from starting a deadly tobacco addiction and help more adults quit. 

Smoking rates are at their lowest levels in decades, with 8 percent of high school kids and 15.5 percent of adults smoking cigarettes.

Take Action

Photo of Tobacco Products

Oppose efforts to weaken government oversight of tobacco products

Ask Congress to oppose efforts to weaken the FDA's oversight authority over all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, cigars and hookahs.

Latest Updates

September 19, 2019
Massachusetts

Link to letter online To the editor: As a concerned healthcare worker and volunteer with the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, I am writing to stress the alarming increased use of e-cigarettes and flavored tobacco products in middle and high school students. In 2011, 1.5 percent

September 10, 2019
National

New initiative launches on heels of 33 states investigating more than 450 cases of lung illnesses associated with vaping, many of which involve teens and young adults New York City, New York —In response to alarming levels of e-cigarette use among youth in the United States—including a 78 percent

June 19, 2019
National

Today the U.S. House is poised to pass an FY 2020 spending bill that includes a $2 billion funding increase for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) including a $300 million funding boost for the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Cancer Candor Blog
May 31, 2019

Each year, World No Tobacco Day shines a global spotlight on the devastating effects that tobacco use and second-hand smoke exposure have on public health worldwide. Everyone – lawmakers, public leaders, parents – should heed the World No Tobacco Day call-to-action, and seize the opportunity to join us in this fight.

Prevention and Cessation Resources

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network and partners provided comments on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Draft Recommendation Statement: Tobacco Smoking Cessation in Adults and Pregnant Women: Behavioral and Pharmacotherapy Interventions.  We recommended that USPSTF clarify that clinicians should ask all adults about tobacco use and provide both provide U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved pharmacotherapy and behavioral interventions for cessation in adults who use tobacco.

The American Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network provided comments on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) Draft Recommendation Statement: Tobacco Smoking Cessation in Adults and Pregnant Women: Behavioral and Pharmacotherapy Interventions.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is an independent panel of experts charged with reviewing the scientific evidence for clinical preventive services and developing evidence-based recommendations about their delivery.