Cancer Prevention

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More than half of all cancer deaths can be prevented by fully leveraging the knowledge, tools and medical breakthroughs we have today.

Providing everyone with the opportunity to have a health lifestyle and true access to cancer screenings - like mammograms and colonoscopies - could save thousands of lives every year.

We are working to pass laws at every level of government that are proven to help prevent and detect cancer.

Half of all cancer deaths can be prevented.

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Expand funding for lifesaving breast and cervical cancer prevention programs

Congress should expand funding for a program that provides lifesaving mammograms and pap tests to thousands of American women each year.  Ask Congress to prioritize funding for these lifesaving cancer screenings.

Latest Updates

March 2, 2020
National

Patient and health advocacy groups representing millions of Americans with pre-existing conditions are applauding the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to hear arguments in the case of Texas v. United States this term. The case is the latest court challenge to the health care law known as the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

February 11, 2020

They were there to make a point. And they couldn’t have been more clear. Where you live should not determine if you live. On a gray, rainy day in Washington, D.C., 12 ACS CAN volunteers from across the county met with their members of Congress and laid out the path

February 3, 2020
Arizona

The annual Day at the Capitol brings together cancer advocates from across the state Wednesday, Feb. 5.

January 30, 2020
National

Today the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced guidance that would fundamentally alter the Medicaid program.

Cancer Prevention Resources

The American Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network provided comments on the Draft Recommendation Statement: Aspirin to Prevent Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer.

Every day, almost 1,600 people in America die from cancer. About half of all cancer deaths could be prevented by applying proven prevention and early detection strategies.

Cancer is the second leading cause of death in the United States. In 2013, more than 580,000 people will die of cancer, and more than 1.66 million people are expected to be diagnosed. Each year, cancer costs the United States an estimated $201.5 billion, due to lost productivity and direct medical costs.