Cancer Prevention

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More than half of all cancer deaths can be prevented by fully leveraging the knowledge, tools and medical breakthroughs we have today.

Providing everyone with the opportunity to have a healthy lifestyle and true access to cancer screenings - like mammograms and colonoscopies - could save thousands of lives every year.

We are working to pass laws at every level of government that are proven to help prevent and detect cancer.

Half of all cancer deaths can be prevented.

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Let's save more lives from breast and cervical cancer

Join us in calling on Congress to ensure women – no matter where they live or how little money they make – can get a free or inexpensive breast or cervical cancer screening.

Latest Updates

January 18, 2022
New York

Governor Hochul has released her Executive Budget for the next fiscal year. ACS CAN is asking for increases in funding for the Cancer Services Program and tobacco control.

January 13, 2022

Today the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pension (HELP) Committee voted to confirm Robert Califf as the next commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

December 20, 2021
National

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network is celebrating the 50 th anniversary of President Richard Nixon’s signing of the National Cancer Act into law. The law, which took effect December 23, 1971, transformed the nation’s approach to preventing, detecting, and treating the disease.

September 22, 2021
National

ACS CAN is advocating for a pathway for Medicare coverage for innovative cancer early detection, once Multi-Cancer Early Detection Tests are FDA approved and clinical benefit is shown.

Cancer Prevention Resources

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States. Yet, about 1 in 3 adults aged 50 to 75 are not getting tested as recommended. This factsheet discusses the importance of screening for colorectal cancer and what can be done to improve screening in the U.S.

 

An estimated 149,500 men and women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2021 and 52,980 individuals are estimated to die from the disease. Without a continued, dedicated federal investment in colorectal cancer prevention and early detection, the U.S. could experience a reduction in screening leading to increases in completely preventable colorectal cancer cases and deaths. This factsheet discusses the importance of continued funding for the Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP).

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second-leading cause of cancer death in women. Breast cancer screening is an effective way of reducing breast cancer mortality and increasing survival odds.