Reducing Health Disparities

Share

Cancer impacts everyone, but it doesn’t impact everyone equally. We are working to ensure everyone has a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer. No one should be disadvantaged in their fight against cancer because of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, their gender identity, their disability status, or where they live.

From ensuring greater diversity among clinical trial participants to improving access to quality, affordable health care, we are asking lawmakers to reduce disparities in cancer care by advancing policies that break down existing barriers.

Black women are 40% more likely to die of breast cancer than white women overall

Latest Updates

December 20, 2021
National

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network is celebrating the 50 th anniversary of President Richard Nixon’s signing of the National Cancer Act into law. The law, which took effect December 23, 1971, transformed the nation’s approach to preventing, detecting, and treating the disease.

December 7, 2021
National

A new survey offers insight into how a national paid family and medical leave program could benefit cancer patients and survivors who struggle with missed work and lost income due to their illness.

November 15, 2021
National

More than 150 organizations representing patients, providers and health equity advocates sent a letter to Congress today urging them to pass the Diversifying Investigations Via Equitable Research Studies for Everyone (DIVERSE) Trials Act into law.

November 2, 2021
New York

Gov Hochul has enacted a measure that will increase the list of vaccines a pharmacist may administer.

Reducing Health Disparities Resources

ACS CAN and more than 150 organizations representing patients, providers and health equity advocates sent a letter to Congress urging them to pass the Diversifying Investigations Via Equitable Research Studies for Everyone (DIVERSE) Trials Act into law to remove barriers to clinical trial enrollment.

For 30 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program has decreased disparities in breast and cervical cancer deaths.

Cancer biomarker testing can lead to targeted therapy which can improve survival and quality of life by connecting patients to the most beneficial treatment for their disease.