Reducing Health Disparities

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Cancer impacts everyone, but it doesn’t impact everyone equally. We are working to ensure everyone has a fair and just opportunity to prevent, find, treat, and survive cancer. No one should be disadvantaged in their fight against cancer because of how much money they make, the color of their skin, their sexual orientation, their gender identity, their disability status, or where they live.

From ensuring greater diversity among clinical trial participants to improving access to quality, affordable health care, we are asking lawmakers to reduce disparities in cancer care by advancing policies that break down existing barriers.

Black women are 40% more likely to die of breast cancer than white women overall

Latest Updates

August 5, 2020

Missouri voters stood up for public health on Tuesday and passed a ballot measure to increase access to health insurance coverage for more Missourians through the state’s Medicaid program, following on the heels of Oklahomans who made the same move at the end of June.

July 31, 2020

Today the U.S. House of Representatives voted on an FY 2021 spending bill that includes a $5.5 billion funding increase for the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Half of the increase would be considered emergency funding and the other half would be divided among the various institutes, including a nearly $470 million funding boost for the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

Cancer Candor Blog
July 29, 2020

One critical approach to reducing health disparities is increasing access to affordable health care. Lisa joined Dr. Lori Pierce, the current President of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), to jointly author an editorial for this year’s Urban One Engaging Black America on the importance of removing barriers to care.

July 21, 2020
South Carolina

COLUMBIA, SC – July 21, 2020 – Despite national drops in cancer mortality and incidence rates, colorectal cancer (CRC) remains the second leading cause of cancer death for men and women in South Carolina. Black and Latinx communities across the state experience significantly higher rates of CRC as a

Reducing Health Disparities Resources

Research is critical to understanding and reducing cancer disparities, as well as examining gaps in cancer prevention and care delivery that contribute to these disparities. Clinical trials are a key part of research and enable the development of better drugs and treatments for cancer.

All individuals should have equitable access to quality cancer care and equal opportunity to live a healthy life. Our ability to continue to make progress against cancer relies heavily on eliminating the inequities that exist in cancer care.

Although tobacco-related cancer incidence and mortality have declined in the U.S., we continue to see disparities by socioeconomic status (SES), race/ethnicity, educational level, gender, sexual orientation, and geographic location. Our ability to continue to make progress against cancer relies h