Breast and Cervical Cancer

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Mammograms save lives. But, even today, too many women don't have access to lifesaving breast and cervical cancer screenings.

We are working in Congress and in every state legislature to ensure funding for the federal cancer screening and early detection program that has already helped millions of women and saved thousands of lives.

More than 40,000 women will die from breast cancer this year, while over 13,000 will be diagnosed with cervical cancer.  We're working to convince Congress to increase funding for breast and cervical cancer research that could lead to new medical breakthroughs and save more lives.

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Congress: Increase Funding For Lifesaving Cancer Screening Programs

The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) is a critical safety net to ensure that all eligible individuals – no matter where they live or how little money they make – can get a free or inexpensive breast or cervical cancer screening. But today, the program doesn’t have enough funding to serve everyone who needs it.

Latest Updates

March 28, 2024
South Dakota

SJR 501, passed with little in the way of discussion or specifics, will be placed on the November ballot as Amendment F. ACS CAN will be part of a broad coalition of health advocacy groups opposed as similar programs in other Medicaid Expansion states have accomplished little other than stripping health care from those most in need.

March 27, 2024
New York

ALBANY, NY – MARCH 27, 2024 – Earlier today, elected officials stood alongside cancer survivors, patient advocates and public health leaders to highlight opportunities in the 2024-25 FY budget aimed at helping more New Yorkers prevent cancer, detect it early and alleviate its burden on families. Advocates with and

March 27, 2024
New York

ALBANY, NY - 27 DE MARZO DE 2024 - Funcionarios electos se unieron hoy a sobrevivientes de cáncer, defensores de los derechos de los pacientes y líderes de salud pública para resaltar las oportunidades que se presentan en el presupuesto del año fiscal 2024-25 para a ayudar a más

March 21, 2024
New York

The following was originally published in the Albany Times Union on March 21, 2024. Over the past 30 years, the risk of dying from cancer has steadily declined. This trend can partially be explained by declines in smoking rates, progress in early cancer detection and advances in

Breast and Cervical Cancer Resources

Approximately 1 in 8 women (13%) will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer in her lifetime, and 1 in 39 women (3%) will die from breast cancer. In 2023, an estimated 297,790 women in the U.S. will be diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and 43,170 will die from the disease. Despite the fact that U.S. breast cancer death rates have been declining for several decades, not all people have benefited equally from the advances in prevention, early detection, and treatments that have helped achieve these lower rates.

Our ability to continue to make progress against cancer relies heavily on eliminating inequities that exist in breast cancer prevention and treatment. That is why ACS CAN advocates for policies to reduce the disparities in breast cancer by improving access to prevention and early detection services, patient navigation services, insurance coverage, in-network facilities, and clinical trials.

If detected early, cervical cancer is one of the most successfully treatable cancers. Incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer have declined by over 50 percent in the past 40 years, largely due to improved screening and early detection. However, the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Efforts to reduce barriers to screening could greatly improve cervical cancer screening rates, particularly for disparate populations.

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