Tobacco

ACS CAN supports a comprehensive approach to reducing tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke, including increasing taxes on all tobacco products, implementing comprehensive smoke-free laws, fully funding and sustaining evidence-based, statewide tobacco control programs, ensuring access to clinical cessation services and working with the Food and Drug Administration to regulate tobacco products and their marketing.

Tobacco Resources:

For the past 20 years – since the states settled their lawsuits against the major tobacco companies in November 1998 – we have issued annual reports assessing how well the states have kept their promise to use a significant portion of their settlement funds to combat tobacco use in the United Sta

The use of tobacco products remains the nation’s number one cause of preventable death, killing more than 480,000 Americans each year. That is why the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) and the American Cancer Society (ACS) have long been engaged in the fight against tobacco.

Cigarette smoking is responsible for about one-third of all cancer deaths in the nation overall. A new study from the American Cancer Society provides state-level estimates of the number of adult deaths from smoking in 2014.

January 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the landmark Surgeon General’s Report linking smoking to lung cancer.

The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General calls for an integrated national tobacco control strategy of expanded implementation of tobacco control measures and new “end game” strategies to meet the vision of a society free of tobacco-related death and disease. 

Regulation and Products Resources:

The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (TCA) – signed into law by President Obama in 2009 - granted the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authority to regulate the manufacture, marketing, and sale of tobacco products. Prior to the law, tobacco products were largely unregulated outside of required warning labels and limited restrictions on advertising.

The Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (Tobacco Control Act) – signed into law by President Obama in 2009 - grants the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) authority to regulate the manufacture, marketing, and distribution of tobacco products.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, with its partners, provided comments to the Food and Drug Administration on the need for regulation of waterpipes (or hookahs).

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network provided comments to the Food and Drug Administration on the proposed clarification of when products made or derived from tobacco are to be regulated as drugs, devices, or combination products under the authority of the Center for Drug Evaluation

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, with its partners, provided comments to the Food and Drug Administration urging rulemaking for child-resistant packaging and nicotine exposure warnings on liquid nicotine products.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network strongly supports the Food and Drug Administration proposed rule to deem all tobacco products subject to its authority with additional recommendations to further protect public health.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, with its partners, provided comments to the Food and Drug Administration on the proposal to deem all tobacco products under its authority as provided by the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act.

Cigars are dangerous to our health and economy, yet sales are increasing and use by youth is rising.

Smoking waterpipes, as well as breathing secondhand smoke from waterpipes, is at least as harmful as exposure to cigarette smoke.

Smoke Free Resources:

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, with its partners, supports the Department of Housing and Urban Development's proposal to make public housing smoke-free.

Secondhand smoke (SHS) is an occupational hazard for many casino workers- from dealers to security. Job-related exposure to SHS is a significant, but entirely preventable, cause of premature death among U.S. workers.

More than 40 years after former U.S. Surgeon General Jesse Steinfeld first exposed the potential health risks of secondhand smoke (SHS) in 1971,1 and nearly 30 years after a subsequent Surgeon General’s report stated that SHS causes lung cancer and other diseases,2 all U.S.

The Surgeon General’s reported in 20061 and again 20102 that there is no risk-free level of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS).

Secondhand smoke is a serious health hazard. Ventilation technologies do not sufficiently protect individuals from the harmful effects of breathing in secondhand smoke.

Tobacco users are not the only ones who breathe its deadly smoke - all the people around them are forced to inhale it too. Secondhand smoke causes more than 42,000 deaths, including more than 7,000 lung cancer deaths among nonsmoking adults each year.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) provided comments on the National Center for Healthy Housing's and the American Public Health Association’s draft National Healthy Housing Standard.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) provided comments in response to HUD's request for information on adopting smoke-free policies in public housing authorities and multifamily housing.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American Heart Association, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, and American Lung Association provided joint comments in response to the Department of Transportation (DOT)’s Notice of Proposed Rulemaking on Smoking of Electronic Cigarettes on Aircraf

Prevention and Cessation Resources:

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) supports raising the minimum age for sale of all tobacco products to age 21 with strong retailer compliance and active enforcement as part of its comprehensive strategy to reduce youth initiation.

In 2014, 32 percent of Medicaid enrollees were smokers, compared with 17 percent of the general population. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., with more than 480,000 deaths each year caused by cigarette smoking.

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., with more than 480,000 deaths each year caused by cigarette smoking.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) and ACS CAN submitted comments on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Draft Research Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Use Prevention in Children and Adolescents: Primary Care Interventions.