Prevention and Early Detection

ACS CAN advocates for public policies that can prevent nearly half of all cancer deaths by ensuring access to recommended cancer screenings, protecting the public from skin cancer risk, reducing tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke and supporting people in increasing physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and managing their weight.

Prevention and Early Detection Resources:

For more than 20 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program has decreased disparities in breast and cervical cancer deaths.

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second-leading cause of cancer death in women. Breast cancer screening is an effective way of reducing breast cancer mortality and increasing survival odds. 

In the U.S., colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and in women, and the second most common cause of cancer deaths when men and women are combined. Despite advancements in screening and treatment, CRC does not affect every community the same. 

Current federal law provides life-saving coverage of cancer prevention and early detection services and programs.  These provisions are crucial to reducing the incidence and impact of cancer in the United States.  They are also crucial in helping cancer survivors remain cancer-free and lead healthy lives.

Tobacco Resources:

The U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), U.S. Surgeon General, and Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have all declared youth e-cigarette use to be an epidemic. E-cigarettes are the most used tobacco product among youth and, like any tobacco product, are unsafe. E-cigarette use is also most common among younger adults. Action is urgently needed to reverse these dangerous trends.

This factsheet provides an overview of how tobacco control policies can help achieve health equity.

Cigars pose a real danger to the long-term health of all Americans – and to young people especially – yet government regulation of cigars lags behind that of cigarettes and e-cigarettes. 

This factsheet provides an overview of ACS CAN's tobacco control priorities.

This factsheet provides state-specific numbers and proprotions of smoking-related cancer cases and deaths.

This factsheet provides a summary of the modified risk tobacco producat application process at FDA and ACS CAN's position.

This joint statement from a consortium of public health organizations sets forth aspirational principles to help local and state health departments, decisionmakers, advocates, and other stakeholders advance equitable enforcement practices related to the purchase, possession, sale, and distribution of all tobacco products. These principles can also help address tobacco addiction and reduce tobacco-related harms while maintaining and improving the efficacy of enforcement of commercial tobacco laws and policies.

January 2014 marked the 50th anniversary of the landmark Surgeon General’s Report linking smoking to lung cancer.

The Health Consequences of Smoking – 50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General calls for an integrated national tobacco control strategy of expanded implementation of tobacco control measures and new “end game” strategies to meet the vision of a society free of tobacco-related death and disease. 

Tanning and Sun Safety Resources:

The greatest avoidable known risk factor for skin cancer is the use of indoor tanning devices. Yet, each year, approximately nine million Americans engage in indoor tanning.The desire for a tanned appearance causes many people, especially young adults and teenagers, to ignore the serious risks and health warnings and use indoor tanning devices.

Despite reputable scientific studies showing that tanning devices can cause skin cancer, misconceptions about the risks and dangers of indoor tanning persist. This is due, in part, to misleading advertising and health claims by the tanning industry. This fact sheet debunks many of the most egregious industry claims about indoor tanning.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) advocates for public policies that will help reduce the risk of skin cancer associated with the use of indoor tanning devices.

Skin cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in the United States, and rates have been rising for the past 30 years.This factsheet discusses the types of skin cancer, risk factors for the disease, and how it can be prevented.  

Screening Resources:

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Black men. Black men are over twice as likely to die from prostate cancer compared to every other racial and ethnic group and they are also more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage. Black men with lower-grade (less aggressive) disease are actually more likely to die from prostate cancer than white men. The reasons for this are complex and include interactions between social, behavioral and biological factors.

 

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States. Yet, about 1 in 3 adults aged 50 to 75 are not getting tested as recommended. This factsheet discusses the importance of screening for colorectal cancer and what can be done to improve screening in the U.S.

 

An estimated 149,500 men and women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2021 and 52,980 individuals are estimated to die from the disease. Without a continued, dedicated federal investment in colorectal cancer prevention and early detection, the U.S. could experience a reduction in screening leading to increases in completely preventable colorectal cancer cases and deaths. This factsheet discusses the importance of continued funding for the Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP).

For more than 20 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program has decreased disparities in breast and cervical cancer deaths.

This document provides a snapshot of the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on cancer screenings and diganoses and what ACS CAN is advocating to ensure everyone has access to live-saving cancer screenings.

This factsheet reviews recommended guidelines and insurance coverge for lung cancer screening.

If detected early, cervical cancer is one of the most successfully treatable cancers. Incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer have declined by over 50 percent in the past 40 years, largely due to improved screening and early detection. However, the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Efforts to reduce barriers to screening could greatly improve cervical cancer screening rates, particularly for disparate populations.

Healthy Eating and Active Living Resources:

Kids' meals are designed to appeal to young children but can be higher in calories, saturated fat, and sodium while being lower in nutrients than foods eaten at home.  This fact sheet outlines potential issues with kids' meals and notes ACS CAN's support for improving the nutritional quality for food and beverage options in restaurants, particularly for children’s meals.  

Excess body weight, physical inactivity, excess alcohol consumption, and poor nutrition are major risk factors for cancer, and approximately one fifth of the estimated 1.7 million cancer cases expected to be diagnosed this year can be attributed to the combination of these risk factors.  This fact sheet explains the role of healthy eating and active living in reducing one's cancer risk and notes public-policy opportunities to help to create healthy social and physical environments and to provide consumers with clear, useful information that fosters healthy lifestyle choices.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) respectfully submit the following comments on the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA’s) comprehensive, multi-year Nutrition Innovation Strategy.  

For the majority of Americans who do not use tobacco products, weight management, good nutrition, and physical activity are the greatest modifiable determinants of cancer risk.