Prevention and Early Detection

ACS CAN advocates for public policies that can prevent nearly half of all cancer deaths by ensuring access to recommended cancer screenings, protecting the public from skin cancer risk, reducing tobacco use and exposure to secondhand smoke and supporting people in increasing physical activity, eating a healthy diet, and managing their weight.

Prevention and Early Detection Resources:

Tobacco is still the number one cause of preventable death nationwide yet the current funding levels for tobacco control programs is not sufficient to prevent and address tobacco-related disparities. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that states annually spend 12% of funds from tobacco taxes and lawsuits on tobacco control programs.

Flavors are a marketing weapon the tobacco manufacturers use to target youth and young people to a lifetime of addiction. Altering tobacco product ingredients and design, like adding flavors, can improve the ease of use of a product by masking harsh effects, facilitating nicotine uptake, and increasing a product’s overall appeal.

Without sustained, dedicated federal investment in tobacco prevention and control for the Centers for Disease Control Office of Smoking and Health (OSH) , the public’s – particularly youth - health is at risk from increased tobacco use, decreased quitting rates, and greater exposure to secondhand smoke. All of these risks result in preventable tobacco-related disparities, as well as premature death.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) is focused on public policies that help to create healthy social and physical environments and to provide consumers with clear, useful information that fosters healthy lifestyle choices. 

Tobacco Resources:

Tobacco is still the number one cause of preventable death nationwide yet the current funding levels for tobacco control programs is not sufficient to prevent and address tobacco-related disparities. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends that states annually spend 12% of funds from tobacco taxes and lawsuits on tobacco control programs.

Flavors are a marketing weapon the tobacco manufacturers use to target youth and young people to a lifetime of addiction. Altering tobacco product ingredients and design, like adding flavors, can improve the ease of use of a product by masking harsh effects, facilitating nicotine uptake, and increasing a product’s overall appeal.

Without sustained, dedicated federal investment in tobacco prevention and control for the Centers for Disease Control Office of Smoking and Health (OSH) , the public’s – particularly youth - health is at risk from increased tobacco use, decreased quitting rates, and greater exposure to secondhand smoke. All of these risks result in preventable tobacco-related disparities, as well as premature death.

The U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS), U.S. Surgeon General, and Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have all declared youth e-cigarette use to be an epidemic. E-cigarettes are the most used tobacco product among youth and, like any tobacco product, are unsafe. E-cigarette use is also most common among younger adults. Action is urgently needed to reverse these dangerous trends.

Screening Resources:

For 30 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program has decreased disparities in breast and cervical cancer deaths.

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Black men. Black men are over twice as likely to die from prostate cancer compared to every other racial and ethnic group and they are also more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage. Black men with lower-grade (less aggressive) disease are actually more likely to die from prostate cancer than white men. The reasons for this are complex and include interactions between social, behavioral and biological factors.

 

An estimated 151,030 men and women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2022 and 52,580 individuals are estimated to die from the disease. Without a continued, dedicated federal investment in colorectal cancer prevention and early detection, the U.S. could experience a reduction in screening leading to increases in completely preventable colorectal cancer cases and deaths. This factsheet discusses the importance of continued funding for the Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP).

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States. Yet, about 1 in 3 adults aged 50 to 75 are not getting tested as recommended. This factsheet discusses the importance of screening for colorectal cancer and what can be done to improve screening in the U.S.

 

In the U.S., colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and in women, and the second most common cause of cancer deaths when men and women are combined. Despite advancements in screening and treatment, CRC does not affect every community the same. 

This factsheet reviews recommended guidelines and insurance coverge for lung cancer screening.

If detected early, cervical cancer is one of the most successfully treatable cancers. Incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer have declined by over 50 percent in the past 40 years, largely due to improved screening and early detection. However, the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Efforts to reduce barriers to screening could greatly improve cervical cancer screening rates, particularly for disparate populations.

Healthy Eating and Active Living Resources:

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) is focused on public policies that help to create healthy social and physical environments and to provide consumers with clear, useful information that fosters healthy lifestyle choices. 

ACS and ACS CAN submitted comments and recommendations regarding the White House Conference on Hunger, Nutrition, and Health, planned to be held in September 2022. 

ACS and ACS CAN submitted comments on Topics and Scientific Questions for the 2025-2030 Dietary Guidelines for Americans.