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Health Equity

ACS CAN supports health equity efforts for all Americans so they may receive access to quality care, no matter their race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, income level or ZIP code. 

Health Equity Resources:

In 2024, an estimated 13,820 people in the U.S. will be diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer, and 4,360 will die from the disease. Cervical cancer can affect any person with a cervix and most often is caused by certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV). Persistent HPV infection causes almost all cervical cancers but fortunately there is a safe and effective vaccine against HPV.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) believes everyone should have a fair and just opportunity to prevent, detect, treat, and survive cancer. No one should be disadvantaged in their fight against cancer because of income, race, gender identity, sexual orientation, disability status, or where they live. From preventive screening and early detection, through diagnosis and treatment, and into survivorship, there are several factors that influence cancer disparities among different populations across the cancer continuum.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) commented on the National Academy of Sciences’ request for federal policies that contribute to racial and ethnic health inequities.

Our ability to continue to make progress against cancer relies heavily on eliminating inequities that exist in breast cancer prevention and treatment. That is why ACS CAN advocates for policies to reduce the disparities in breast cancer by improving access to prevention and early detection services, patient navigation services, insurance coverage, in-network facilities, and clinical trials.

Half of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer/Questioning (LGBTQ+) cancer patients and survivors report they are concerned about facing discrimination in a health care setting. More than one-third have experienced discrimination in a healthcare setting, with significant impacts on their care.

Every person regardless of their race, color, national origin, gender identiy, sexual orientation, age or disability deserves to be given equal access to timely, quality, comprehensive health care without discrimination.

Cancer biomarker testing can lead to targeted therapy which can improve survival and quality of life by connecting patients to the most beneficial treatment for their disease.

Our latest survey finds that female cancer patients are less satisfied with the quality of their cancer care than male cancer patients and are more likely to report that their symptoms were not taken seriously and that they had to prove their symptoms to providers.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Nondiscrimination in Health Programs and Activities (section 1557) proposed rule.