Screening

ACS CAN is committed to ensuring all Americans have access to and coverage of evidence-based prevention and early detection services that are critical to the fight against cancer. 

Screening Resources:

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in Black men. Black men are over twice as likely to die from prostate cancer compared to every other racial and ethnic group and they are also more likely to be diagnosed at an advanced stage. Black men with lower-grade (less aggressive) disease are actually more likely to die from prostate cancer than white men. The reasons for this are complex and include interactions between social, behavioral and biological factors.

 

For more than 20 years, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program has decreased disparities in breast and cervical cancer deaths.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer in men and women and the second leading cause of cancer death in men and women combined in the United States. Yet, about 1 in 3 adults aged 50 to 75 are not getting tested as recommended. This factsheet discusses the importance of screening for colorectal cancer and what can be done to improve screening in the U.S.

 

An estimated 149,500 men and women will be diagnosed with colorectal cancer in 2021 and 52,980 individuals are estimated to die from the disease. Without a continued, dedicated federal investment in colorectal cancer prevention and early detection, the U.S. could experience a reduction in screening leading to increases in completely preventable colorectal cancer cases and deaths. This factsheet discusses the importance of continued funding for the Colorectal Cancer Control Program (CRCCP).

In the U.S., colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and in women, and the second most common cause of cancer deaths when men and women are combined. Despite advancements in screening and treatment, CRC does not affect every community the same. 

This document provides a snapshot of the COVID-19 pandemic's impact on cancer screenings and diganoses and what ACS CAN is advocating to ensure everyone has access to live-saving cancer screenings.

This factsheet reviews recommended guidelines and insurance coverge for lung cancer screening.

If detected early, cervical cancer is one of the most successfully treatable cancers. Incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer have declined by over 50 percent in the past 40 years, largely due to improved screening and early detection. However, the rate of decline has slowed in recent years. Efforts to reduce barriers to screening could greatly improve cervical cancer screening rates, particularly for disparate populations.