Prevention and Cessation

We are working to increase funding for comprehensive tobacco control programs and access to evidence-based cessation treatment, which prevents youth initiation and supports successful quitting. Additionally, raising the minimum sale age for tobacco to 21 can prevent a deadly addiction. 

Prevention and Cessation Resources:

Comments from the American Cancer Society and American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Draft Recommendation Statement on Primary Care Interventions for Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use in Children and Adolescents

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) is pleased to submit comments on the request for information concerning advancing tobacco control practices to prevent initiation of tobacco use among youth and young adults, eliminate exposure to secondhand smoke, and identifying the eliminating tobacco-related disparities.

Comments from the American Cancer Society and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Draft Research Plan for Tobacco Smoking Cessation in Adults, Including Pregnant Women: Interventions

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) is pleased to provide comments on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) request for information on Effective, Large-Scale, Sustainable Approaches to Help People Quit Using Tobacco by Employing Evidence-Based Treatment Options.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) are pleased to provide comments on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Draft Recommendation Statement on Primary Care Interventions for Prevention and Cessation of Tobacco Use in Children and Adolescents

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) supports raising the minimum age for sale of all tobacco products to age 21 with strong retailer compliance and active enforcement as part of its comprehensive strategy to reduce youth initiation.

In 2014, 32 percent of Medicaid enrollees were smokers, compared with 17 percent of the general population. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., with more than 480,000 deaths each year caused by cigarette smoking.

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the U.S., with more than 480,000 deaths each year caused by cigarette smoking.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) and ACS CAN submitted comments on the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Draft Research Plan for Tobacco and Nicotine Use Prevention in Children and Adolescents: Primary Care Interventions.