Remove Hurdles to Cancer Care

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COVID-19 has shone a spotlight on the significant barriers to affordable health care that cancer patients have long faced. While relief packages and proposals to date have worked to address affordability of COVID-specific testing and treatment, policymakers must also tackle hurdles that cancer patients face like removing the red tape of prior authorization and step therapy, reducing out-of-pocket costs, and ensuring cost-sharing assistance directly benefits patients. There has been a great deal of research and investment in effective therapies that allow people fighting cancer to survive and live longer. Cancer patients need Congress to act quickly to remove hurdles to quality care.

56% of cancer patients and survivors are worried about being able to afford their treatment

Latest Updates

June 21, 2022
California

The California Assembly Health Committee passed a bill today that would ensure comprehensive biomarker testing is covered by more insurance plans, including Medi-Cal, when supported by medical and scientific evidence.

April 26, 2022

Legislation introduced in the U.S. House of Representatives today aims to improve access to quality health care for and decrease health disparities in communities of color.

April 15, 2022
Wisconsin

Governor Tony Evers vetoed two bills that would have tightened access to health care coverage for limited-income Wisconsinites. Senate Bill 905/Assembly Bill 934 aimed to require Medicaid enrollees to prove eligibility and re-apply every six months. Senate Bill 912/Assembly Bill 936 would have added new work rules to the program,

March 31, 2022
Ohio

COLUMBUS, OHIO – After two years of virtual Cancer Action Days due to the pandemic, cancer patients, survivors and caregivers from across the state traveled to the Capitol in Columbus yesterday to meet in person with their elected officials. They let their lawmakers know that they can and must do

Remove Hurdles to Cancer Care Resources

Most patients experience spikes in their health care costs around the time of a cancer diagnosis as they pay their deductible and out-of-pocket maximum. For patients on high deductible plans, this spike can mean bills due for several thousands of dollars within one month.

The U.S. spent approximately $183 billion on cancer-related health care in 2015. This represents a signification portion of the total health care spending in the U.S. And it is expected to keep growing. By 2030 cancer-related health care spending is expected to reach nearly $246 billion.

Many cancer patients take multiple drugs as part of their treatment – often for many months or years. While drugs are not the only costly part of cancer treatment, finding ways to reduce these costs for patients and payers will significantly reduce the overall cost burden of cancer.