Access to Health Care

ACS CAN advocates for policies that provide access to treatments and services people with cancer need for their care - including those who may be newly diagnosed, in active treatment and cancer survivors.

Access to Health Care Resources:

ACS CAN is concerned that over the past year, policymakers and the administration have taken several legislative and regulatory actions that could make it harder for individuals with pre-existing conditions to obtain health insurance coverage that is adequate, affordable, and available, thereby jeopardizing access to life-sustaining care.

Where healthcare dollars are spent compared with dollars on cancer care, 2015.

ACS CAN submitted comments regarding Alabama's proposed plan year 2020 Essential Health Benefit Benchmark Revisions.

ACS CAN submitted comments regarding New Jersey's request for a 1332 waiver to create a reinsurance program.

ACS CAN is very concerned about proposed policy changes that would move coverage of cancer and supportive care drugs from Part B to Part D. Proposed policy changes could jeopardize patient access to drugs, create potential safety issues, and increase out-of-pocket costs for patients who already struggle to afford cancer treatment under the current Medicare program.

ACS CAN submitted comments regarding the CMS Innovation Center's request for information on a new direction.

ACS CAN comments to Steven Mnuchin and Seema Verma on Iowa's 1332 Waiver

Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) are an integral part of the health care safety-net, providing access to affordable primary care services for nearly 26 million uninsured or underinsured Americans many of whom have cancer. The centers are non-profit, community-directed, and serve high need rural and urban communities that face obstacles to health care, including cost and lack of insurance, as well as geographic and language barriers. FQHCs provide access to quality preventive and primary care services that are critical for cancer patients, survivors, and those who will be diagnosed with cancer.

This ACS CAN report focuses specifically on the costs of cancer borne by patients in active treatment as well as survivors.  It examines the factors contributing to the cost of cancer care, the type of direct costs patients pay, and the indirect costs associated with cancer.

Prescription Drug Affordability Resources:

For an individual with specific health care needs – like cancer patients and survivors – the drugs covered by a health plan and corresponding cost sharing for each drug is important information when choosing health insurance. However, to make an informed choice, formulary information must be disclosed to the individual.

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Private Health Insurance Resources:

This analysis examines two issues of particular interest to the American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) and its members: the extent of coverage and cost-sharing for cancer drugs, and whether information on the coverage of cancer drugs can be readily obtained, compared, and understood by patients.

Utilization management is a collection of treatment review and cost reduction techniques used by health insurers and health plans. Health plans frequently employ utilization management techniques in their prescription drug benefit, particularly for high-cost specialty medications.

This report highlights the severe challenges cancer patient may face in paying for life-saving care even when they have private health insurance.

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Reducing Health Disparities Resources:

Telehealth can help to reduce health disparities and improve health outcomes for all individuals, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, or zip code by providing cancer patients with a means of accessing both cancer care and primary care.

Despite notable advances in cancer prevention, screening, and treatment, not all individuals benefit equally from this important progress. This fact sheet provides an overview of current health disparities in cancer care and a snapshot of ACS CAN federal advocacy activities to eliminate these disparities and achieve health equity.

In order to reduce cancer mortality we must fight to achieve health equity, the just and fair opportunity for everyone to prevent, find, treat and survive cancer. This document shows a snapshot of how ACS CAN is fighting for health equity at the national, state and local levels.

Research is critical to understanding and reducing cancer disparities, as well as examining gaps in cancer prevention and care delivery that contribute to these disparities. Clinical trials are a key part of research and enable the development of better drugs and treatments for cancer.

All individuals should have equitable access to quality cancer care and equal opportunity to live a healthy life. Our ability to continue to make progress against cancer relies heavily on eliminating the inequities that exist in cancer care.

Although tobacco-related cancer incidence and mortality have declined in the U.S., we continue to see disparities by socioeconomic status (SES), race/ethnicity, educational level, gender, sexual orientation, and geographic location. Our ability to continue to make progress against cancer relies h

Our ability to continue to make progress against cancer relies heavily on eliminating the inequities that exist in the prevention and early detection of cancer. This factsheet explores how health outcomes vary across groups, barriers to cancer screenings, and how ACS CAN is taking action.

In response to a request from FDA, ACS CAN has provided recommendations for areas of focus for the Office of Minority Health and Health Equity (OMHHE).  Recommendations include assessing the applicability of drug "snapshot" data, evaluating the appropriateness of aggregating racial groups for ana

Despite the fact that US cancer death rates have decreased by 26 percent from 1991 to 2015, not all Americans have benefited equally from the advances in prevention, early detection, and treatments that have helped achieve these lower rates.

Costs and Barriers to Care Resources:

Resources and information from the American Cancer Society about understanding health insurance, particularly for cancer patients and survivors.

The American Cancer Society operates a call center available to all cancer patients and their families, that includes resources and specialists who can help patients with questions about health insurance, enrolling in a plan, and issues accessing care.

ACS CAN comments on 2015 Edition EHR Standards and Certification Criteria Proposed Rule

ACS CAN comments on Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program – Stage 3 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

Despite the fact that US cancer death rates have decreased by 26 percent from 1991 to 2015, not all Americans have benefited equally from the advances in prevention, early detection, and treatments that have helped achieve these lower rates.

A comprehensive plan to address all barriers is necessary to make prevention a national priority.

Adequate and sustained investments and improvements in prevention and early detection are essential to meaningful health care reform. The Affordable Care Act took an important step in addressing these issues by creating a mandatory fund, known as the Prevention and Public Health Fund, to provide an expanded and sustained national investment in evidence-based programs that will help improve health and reduce chronic disease in our nation. 

Ensuring access to evidenced-based cancer screenings and quality treatment is critical to the fight against colorectal cancer. 

Our nation’s health care system is one of the most expensive in the world. Yet the quality of care we deliver to our citizens continues to lag behind that of other industrialized nations. 

Medicaid Resources:

ACS CAN CMS Comments on Massachusetts 1115 Demonstration Waiver

ACS CAN CMS Comments on Maine 1115 Demonstration Waiver

ACS CAN CMS First Comments on Massachusetts 1115 Demonstration Waiver

ACS CAN CMS Comments on Arkansas 1115 Demonstration Waiver

ACS CAN CMS Comments on Wisconsin 1115 Demonstration Waiver

ACS CAN, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association released a joint statement providing principles for any entitlement reform proposal.

ACS CAN, the American Heart Association, the American Diabetes Association released a joint statement in support of the Medicaid program, noting that any reforms should improve the value of care provided under the program and should not reduce access for Medicaid beneficiaries.

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