Access to Health Care

ACS CAN advocates for policies that provide access to treatments and services people with cancer need for their care - including those who may be newly diagnosed, in active treatment and cancer survivors.

Access to Health Care Resources:

These comments were submitted by ACS CAN to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services regarding changes to the template Summary Plan Document that health insurance plans must provide to consumers.

In a letter to the National Association of Insurance Commissioners (NAIC), ACS CAN and other organziations provided specific comments to provide greater consumer protections and improvements to  the NAIC's Health Carrier Prescription Drug Benefit Model Act (Formulary Model Act). 

ACS CAN filed comments on the 2017 Notice of Benefit and Payment Parameters, including issues related to Medicare notices, standardized plan option designs, and network adequacy.

ACS CAN filed comments supporting the Internal Revenue Services' proposed clarification requiring plans to provide coverage for physician services and inpatient hospitalization in order to qualify as minimum value coverage. 

ACS CAN filed comments on the Medicare CY2016 Physician Fee Schedule, supporting CMS' proposals to establish a separate payment for collaborative care services and provide reimbursement for advanced care planning services.

This paper explores from a cancer patient’s perspective the adequacy of provider networks, the transparency of provider network information for the new qualified health plans (QHPs) offered in the Marketplace and the availability of out-of-network coverage.

ACS CAN provided comments on the proposed rule implementing changes to the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) and the Uniform Glossary in which we urged the Tri-Agencies to include a high-cost coverage example (specifically a breast cancer example) in the SBC, to require the inclusion of premium information on the first page of the SBC, and to eliminate the current coverage calculator and require plans to use actual plan data when providing coverage examples.

ACS CAN provided comments on the proposed rule implementing changes to the Medicare Shared Savings Program in which we urged CMS to provide additional beneficiary education and require greater specificity on wasy to improve care coordination for beneficiaries.

Despite the fact that US cancer death rates have decreased by 26 percent from 1991 to 2015, not all Americans have benefited equally from the advances in prevention, early detection, and treatments that have helped achieve these lower rates.

Workforce Resources:

These comments submitted to the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Governance and Financing of Graduate Medical Education address ways to ensure an adequate and appropriate cancer care workforce to treat cancer patients. These comments address workforce issues in cancer care and also palliative care.

Medicare Resources:

This Chartbook provides an overview of cancer among the elderly.

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Disparities Resources:

Despite the fact that US cancer death rates have decreased by 26 percent from 1991 to 2015, not all Americans have benefited equally from the advances in prevention, early detection, and treatments that have helped achieve these lower rates.

On November 10, 2015, ACS CAN hosted the first National Summit on Health Equity in St. Louis, Missouri. The summit brought together over 150 innovative thinkers in public policy, business, technology, academia, patient care, community health, and patient advocacy to examine public policy solutions for assuring greater health equity for cancer patients in the evolving health care system.

Health Care Delivery Resources:

The health care law has several provisions that help prevent individuals from experiencing gaps in health insurance coverage, including the requirement that private health insurance plans allow dependents to remain on their parents’ insurance until age 26.  This provision is important for keeping survivors of childhood and young adult cancer insured, and helps to ensure young adults receive preventive services and screenings.  This provision is a crucial patient protection that must be a part of a health care system that works for cancer patients and survivors.

Consumers need access to health insurance policies that cover a full range of evidence-based health care services – including prevention and primary care – necessary to maintain health, avoid disease, overcome acute illness and live with chronic disease.  Any health care system that works for cancer patients must have standards ensuring that enrollees have access to comprehensive health insurance.

Current federal requirements prohibit most insurance plans from limiting both the lifetime and annual dollar value of benefits.  This ban is one of several important patient protections that must be part of any health care system that works for cancer patients.

 

 

Current federal requirements provide crucial protections that ensure health insurance coverage is comprehensive, not arbitrarily limited, available to all and more affordable.  These protections are especially important for cancer patients, survivors, and those at risk for cancer.  This fact sheet contains a list of the most important provisions in current law for the cancer community.

Resources and information from the American Cancer Society about understanding health insurance, particularly for cancer patients and survivors.

The American Cancer Society operates a call center available to all cancer patients and their families, that includes resources and specialists who can help patients with questions about health insurance, enrolling in a plan, and issues accessing care.

ACS CAN comments on 2015 Edition EHR Standards and Certification Criteria Proposed Rule

ACS CAN comments on Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Electronic Health Record Incentive Program – Stage 3 Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

ACS CAN Comments on ASCO's Proposed Value Framework

Medicaid Resources:

ACS CAN comments on Nebraska's 1115 Demonstration Waiver.

An increasing number of states are seeking greater flexibility in administering their Medicaid programs. The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) give states the opportunity to test innovative or alternative approaches to providing health care coverage to their Medicaid populations through Section 1115 Research and Demonstration Waivers (otherwise known as "1115 waivers"). States must demonstrate that their waivers promote the objectives of the Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP) and CMS must use general criteria to determine whether the objectives of the Medicaid/CHIP programs are met.

The American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) actively reviews and submits written comments on 1115 waivers at both the state and federal levels. ACS CAN’s key concern in evaluating these waivers is the potential impact on cancer patients’, survivors’, and enrollees’ access to preventive services and treatment.

 

Medicaid is the primary health insurance program for low-income Americans, offering quality, affordable, and comprehensive health care coverage to millions of people including those with cancer, those who will be diagnosed with cancer, and cancer survivors. Having health insurance through Medicaid helps Americans stay healthy, go to work, care for their families and pay their bills. The Medicaid program also helps communities, hospitals, schools, and economy thrive.

ACS CAN comments on Tennessee's 1115 Demonstration Waiver.

ACS CAN comments on Utah's 1115 Demonstration Waiver.

ACS CAN Comments on Idaho's 1115 Demonstration Waiver.

ACS CAN Comments on Montana's 1115 Demonstration Waiver.

ACS CAN Comments on Utah's 1115 Demonstration Waiver

ACS CAN CMS Comments on New Mexico's 1115 Demonstration Waiver