Health Care Delivery

ACS CAN supports the continued implementation of provisions in the Affordable Care Act that help cancer patients and their families and provides materials for consumers, cancer patients and cancer survivors who want to learn more about the law or their health insurance options.

Health Care Delivery Resources:

"Surprise billing” is when an insured patient is unknowingly treated by an out-of-network provider and is then billed the difference between what the provider charged, and what the insurer paid. Surprise bills can be significantly higher than the consumer’s standard in-network cost-sharing. 

Many patients with complex diseases like cancer find it difficult to afford their treatments – even when they have health insurance.  Current law establishes a limit on what most private insurance plans can require enrollees to pay in out-of-pocket costs.  These limits protect patients from extremely high costs and are essential to any health care system that works for cancer patients and survivors.

 

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) helps individuals with limited incomes afford their health care coverage by
providing cost-sharing subsidies (like deductibles, coinsurance, and copayments) for silver-level plans
purchased on the health insurance marketplaces. Currently, Congress and the administration are
debating whether to continue funding these cost-sharing reduction subsidies (CSRs). If CSR subsidy
funding is discontinued, health care costs could increase for all marketplace enrollees – regardless of
whether the enrollee qualifies for the CSRs.

This report explores the experiences of cancer patients with their health insurance and financial challenges through interviews with hospital-based financial navigators. The report finds that while the Affordable Care Act has brought crucial improvements to patient access to health insurance, cancer patients still face serious challenges affording their care and using their insurance benefits.

Congressional efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act have included additional funding in an effort to stabilize state individual insurance markets.  The funding level proposed is inadequate, as discussed in more detail in this backgrounder.

Numerous provisions of H.R. 1628, the American Health Care Act (AHCA), would adversely impact access to adequate and affordable health insurance coverage for cancer patients and survivors.

On April 25, 2017, the text of an amendment to the American Health Care Act (AHCA) to be offered by Representative MacArthur (R-NJ) was released.  The amendment could undo several key protections that are critical for cancer patients and survivors – including the prohibition on pre-existing condition exclusions.

As Congress debates enacting changes to the health care market, one concept re-emerging is state high-risk pools to provide health insurance coverage for individuals who otherwise cannot obtain or afford coverage. High risk pools are not a new concept. Prior to the enactment of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) many states operated some form of high risk pool. During implementation of the ACA, a federal high risk pool was established as an interim step to the new marketplaces. The overall success of high risk pools varied. This fact sheet examines how state risk pools work and the impact on persons with cancer and cancer survivors.

Current federal requirements prohibit health insurance plans from denying coverage to individuals with pre-existing conditions like cancer.  These are one of several important patient protections that must be part of any health care system that works for cancer patients.