Patient Quality of Life

ACS CAN advocates for policies that improve the lives of cancer patients by making treatment of their pain and other symptoms and coordination of their care standard protocol throughout their treatment for cancer, starting at the point of diagnosis.
 

Featured Resources

 

Patient Quality of Life Resources:

In the fall of 2018 the House and Senate passed the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment for Patients and Communities Act (the SUPPORT Act)1 – comprehensive legislation to address the opioid epidemic.

A recent flood of legislation meant to curb opioid abuse is inadvertently making it harder for cancer patients and survivors to get legitimate pain care. ACS CAN’s State Pain Policy Report Card evaluates the level of balance states are striking in the pain policies they’re passing.

The Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act was signed into law on July 22, 2016. CARA was the first major legislative effort focused on addressing the opioid epidemic in the U.S.

ACS CAN submitted comments to FDA regarding questions relevant to the newly formed FDA Opioid Policy Steering Committee.

Our brochure helps educate cancer patients and their caregivers about pediatric palliative care and its benefits. From where you can find it to how you receive it, the brochure can help cancer patients access this important level of medical care.

Our brochure helps educate cancer patients and their caregivers about improving quality of life through palliative care and its benefits.

Palliative care is specialized medical care for people with serious illness. This type of care is focused on providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain and stress of a serious illness - from point of diagnosis onward. The goal is to improve quality of life for both the patient and the family. This report shares the stories of patients who have benefited from palliative care and providers who deliver this important care.

ACS CAN was pleased that CDC heeded our prior request to allow open public comment on the proposed CDC opioid prescribing guideline, but remains concerned about the content and implementation of the proposed guideline.

ACS was invited to review a draft version of a CDC guideline on the use of opioids for chronic pain.  This letter summarizes ACS CAN's concerns with the draft guideline and requests that the proposal be withdrawn.