Blog posts matching "Access to Health Care"

September 25, 2012

Understanding Your Health Benefits

IŠ—'m happy to share that starting this week, insurers are required under the Affordable Care Act to present every consumer with a Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC), a document with simple and easy-to-read information on what their plan covers and how much it costs.

August 14, 2012

Majority of States Not Measuring Up on Laws to Fight Cancer

A new edition of the ACS CAN report How Do You Measure Up? shows that the majority of states are not measuring up on legislative solutions to prevent and fight cancer. The report ranks where states stand on these issues that play a critical role in reducing cancer incidence and death. It measures seven specific issues.

June 26, 2012

Guest Post: The Better End

I thought DanŠ—'s knowledge of advanced directives was pertinent to the broader discussion of palliative care because ultimately, and unfortunately, some cancer patients do not get well. So, I invited him to contribute to this blog. I hope you find his perspective useful.

April 30, 2012

Closing the Chronic Disease Gap in Minority Populations

Earlier this month, as part of National Minority Cancer Awareness Week, ACS CAN co-hosted an important briefing on Capitol Hill to discuss the importance of research and prevention in eliminating inequities among minority populations in prevalence rates of and access to health care for chronic diseases.

April 12, 2012

ACS CAN Celebrates Oral Chemotherapy Parity Victory in Nebraska

When you think of a friend or loved one who is battling cancer, you probably imagine their chemotherapy being administered intravenously at a local hospital. However, modern advances in technology and pharmaceuticals have produced chemotherapy drugs that can be taken orally, in pill form. To date, the FDA has approved more than 40 oral anti-cancer medications for the treatment of at least 54 different types of cancer.

March 29, 2012

Guest Post: Removing Barriers to Colorectal Cancer Screening

Imagine that you dropped your car off at a service station for what you thought was a free oil change. You return an hour later to be informed that while the service was underway a small problem was found and repaired (with no input from you), and you now owe $250. How would you take this news? This is the predicament that a number of people face every day due to an oversight in existing Medicare regulations.