Access to Health Care

ACS CAN advocates for policies that provide access to treatments and services people with cancer need for their care - including those who may be newly diagnosed, in active treatment and cancer survivors.

Access to Health Care Resources:

In this letter to the Obama Administration, ACS CAN -- joined by several other organizations representing millions of American health care consumers -- urged the Administration to promptly, effectively, and fully implement the Summary of Benefits and Coverage rule.

ACS CAN filed comments to the Internal Revenue Service on the Health Insurance Premium Tax Credit proposed rule expressing deep concern about the IRS' proposed method for determining whether employment based coverage is affordable for individuals eligible for coverage through a family member's em

In response to the Department of Health and Human Services' proposed rule establishing health insurance exchanges and requirements for qualified health plans (QHPs) provided under the ACA, ACS CAN filed extensive comments urging HHS to ensure that the exchanges and QHPs were designed in a manner

ACS CAN filed comments to the Tri-Agencies responding to the proposed rule implemeting the Summary of Benefits and Coverage (SBC) provisions provided under the ACA.

In this 2011 paper, ACS CAN commissioned the George Washington University Department of Health Policy to explore a range of questions related to the quality of cancer care and health care delivery in the United States in order to gain better insights into some of the barriers to receiving quality

ACS CAN commented on CMS' Accountable Care Organizations (ACOs) proposed rule. Our comments offered specific recommendations to improve the ACO program to better serve the needs of cancer patients and survivors.

Currently, Medicare beneficiaries with a chronic disease such as cancer often receive health care services from multiple physicians and specialists who rarely coordinate care.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) is an independent panel of experts charged with reviewing the scientific evidence for clinical preventive services and developing evidence-based recommendations about their delivery.

Approximately 160 provisions in the final health care legislation will directly impact the millions of Americans who have or will face cancer. The following is a list of the most important provisions for the cancer community:

Workforce Resources:

These comments submitted to the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Governance and Financing of Graduate Medical Education address ways to ensure an adequate and appropriate cancer care workforce to treat cancer patients.

Private Health Insurance Resources:

ACS CAN submitted comments regarding a proposed rule to change Health Reimbursement Arrangements (HRAs) and other account-based group health plans.

ACS CAN submitted comments to CMS regarding Maryland's proposal for a 1332 reinsurance waiver.

ACS CAN submitted comments on July 3, 2018 to CMS regarding Maine's 1332 waiver application to create a reinsurance program.

ACS CAN submitted comments in support of Wisconsin's proposal to create a reinsurance program to lower premiums in the individual insurance market.

On March 6, 2018, ACS CAN filed comments on the proposed rule implementing changes to the Employee Retiree Income Security Act’s (ERISA’s) definition of “employer” for purposes of determining when employers may join together to form an Association Health Plan (AHP).

On March 6, 2018, ACS CAN filed comments on the proposed rule implementing changes to the Employee Retiree Income Security Act’s (ERISA’s) definition of “employer” for purposes of determining when employers may join together to form an Association Health Plan (AHP).

On April 20, 2018, ACS CAN filed comments on the proposed rule amending the definition of short-term, limited-duration (STLD) insurance for purposes of its exclusion from the definition of individual health insurance coverage.

Medicare Resources:

Approximately 160 provisions in the final health care legislation will directly impact the millions of Americans who have or will face cancer. The following is a list of the most important provisions for the cancer community:

This Chartbook provides an overview of cancer among the elderly.

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Disparities Resources:

On November 10, 2015, ACS CAN hosted the first National Summit on Health Equity in St. Louis, Missouri.

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) are the foundation of our national  cancer research program and support research in every state. Today, that program is making remarkable progress in every area of discovery to improve cancer prevention, early detection, treatment, and care.

Health Care Delivery Resources:

A comprehensive plan to address all barriers is necessary to make prevention a national priority.

Adequate and sustained investments and improvements in the prevention and early detection of disease are essential to refocusing the health care system on wellness.

Adequate and sustained investments and improvements in prevention and early detection are essential to meaningful health care reform. The Affordable Care Act took an important step in addressing these issues by creating a mandatory fund, known as the Prevention and Public Health Fund, to provide an expanded and sustained national investment in evidence-based programs that will help improve health and reduce chronic disease in our nation. 

Medicaid coverage of preventive services is essential to improving the long-term health and well-being of our nation’s most vulnerable populations. 

Ensuring access to evidenced-based cancer screenings and quality treatment is critical to the fight against colorectal cancer. 

In this 2011 paper, ACS CAN commissioned the George Washington University Department of Health Policy to explore a range of questions related to the quality of cancer care and health care delivery in the United States in order to gain better insights into some of the barriers to receiving quality

Our nation’s health care system is one of the most expensive in the world. Yet the quality of care we deliver to our citizens continues to lag behind that of other industrialized nations. 

Currently, Medicare beneficiaries with a chronic disease such as cancer often receive health care services from multiple physicians and specialists who rarely coordinate care.

Approximately 160 provisions in the final health care legislation will directly impact the millions of Americans who have or will face cancer. The following is a list of the most important provisions for the cancer community:

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Medicaid Resources:

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

The Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP) is an integral part of the safety-net for lower-income children and their families. CHIP provides access to quality, affordable, and comprehensive health care coverage to nearly nine million lower income children up to age 19 in the U.S. – many of whom have been affected by cancer.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.

A Section 1115 Demonstration Waiver gives states flexibility to design and improve upon their Medicaid programs through pilot or demonstration projects.