Health Care Delivery

ACS CAN supports the continued implementation of provisions in the Affordable Care Act that help cancer patients and their families and provides materials for consumers, cancer patients and cancer survivors who want to learn more about the law or their health insurance options.

Health Care Delivery Resources:

The current health care law has several provisions that help ensure children with cancer have access to quality treatment and care, and that survivors of childhood cancer are able to obtain and maintain affordable health insurance.  These provisions and protections are essential in any health coverage system that intends to provide meaningful care for pediatric cancer patients and survivors.

Much of the public debate regarding health care reform concerns government-funded health insurance like Medicaid and exchanges, but changing health care laws will also affect the health insurance many Americans get through their employers.  Therefore, any changes to current law must not make it harder for cancer patients and survivors to obtain, afford or use their job-based health insurance.

Current federal requirements prohibit health insurance plans from denying coverage to individuals with pre-existing conditions like cancer.  These are one of several important patient protections that must be part of any health care system that works for cancer patients.

Current federal law has several provisions that help prevent individuals and families from experiencing gaps in their health insurance coverage.  Coverage gaps can delay necessary care, which is particularly detrimental to cancer patients and survivors.  Preventing gaps in coverage is a crucial patient protection that must be maintained in our health care and insurance system.

Current federal law provides life-saving coverage of cancer prevention and early detection services and programs.  These provisions are crucial to reducing the incidence and impact of cancer in the United States.  They are also crucial in helping cancer survivors remain cancer-free and lead healthy lives.

The Medicare program covers 55.3 million people, including 46.3 million who qualify due to age and 9 million people who qualify on the basis of a disability.  Medicare beneficiaries - including many cancer patients and survivors - have access to an outpatient prescription drug benefit that provides them with prescription drugs needed to treat their disease or condition.  This benefit – and keeping it affordable – are crucial to any health care system that works for cancer patients and survivors.

High deductible health plans (HDHPs) and health savings accounts (HSAs) are becoming more common in employer-sponsored insurance and the individual and small group markets.  These types of plans are not without risk and features must be implemented carefully so they do not harm cancer patients, survivors or those at risk for cancer.

The health care law has several provisions that help prevent individuals from experiencing gaps in health insurance coverage, including the requirement that private health insurance plans allow dependents to remain on their parents’ insurance until age 26.  This provision is important for keeping survivors of childhood and young adult cancer insured, and helps to ensure young adults receive preventive services and screenings.  This provision is a crucial patient protection that must be a part of a health care system that works for cancer patients and survivors.

Consumers need access to health insurance policies that cover a full range of evidence-based health care services – including prevention and primary care – necessary to maintain health, avoid disease, overcome acute illness and live with chronic disease.  Any health care system that works for cancer patients must have standards ensuring that enrollees have access to comprehensive health insurance.